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Decimals, Ratio and Proportion, Percentage, and Probability

Comparing and Ordering Decimals

Test Yourself

Refer to the table of currency exchange rate to Philippine peso on July 8, 2009. Then answer the questions that follow.

Foreign Currency                  Philippine Peso

Australian Dollar                     38.0824

Bahrain Dinar                          128.765

British Pound                            77.8332

Canadian Dollar                       41.5799

European Euro                         67.6135

Hong Kong Dollar                    6.24762

Japanese Yen                             0.513345

Saudi Arabian Riyal                 12.9255

Singapore Dollar                       33.1318

US Dollar                                    42.4149

  1.  Against the Philippine Peso, which currency hast the greatest value? Bahrain Dinar
  2. Which has the Least Value? Japanese Yen
  3. Which currency rate has a digit whose value is 9 thousandths? Canadian Dollar
  4. In ascending order, which currency rate will be 5th? Australian Dollar
  5. In ascending order, which currency rate will be 7th? US Dollar
  6. In ascending order, which currency rate will be next to European Euro? British Pound
  7. In descending order, which currency rate will be next to British Pound? European Euro
  8. In descending order, which currency rate will be 2nd? British Pound
  9. What are the last 3 currency rates if you arrange them in descending order? Saudi Arabian Riyal, Hong Kong Dollar, Japanese Yen
  10. In ascending order, what will come next to the Canadian Dollar? US Dollar

 

Changing Decimals to Fractions in Simplest Form

We know that a fraction is in its simplest form if the Greatest Common Factor (GCF) of its numerator and denominator is 1.

Since 0.45 = 45/100 and that GCF of 45 and 100 is not 1, 45/100 is not in simplest form

To simplify 45/100 , divide 45 and 100 by their GCF.

45/5 and 100/5 = 9/20             In simplest fraction form: 0.45 = 9/20

Change each decimal to a fraction in simplest form.

  1. 0.5 = 1/2
  2. 0.9 = 9/10
  3. 0.6 = 3/5
  4. 0.27 = 27/100
  5. 0.08 = 2/25

Give the decimal for each fraction.

  1. 1/5 = 0.2
  2. 1/2 = 0.5
  3. 4/5 = 0.8
  4. 5/10 = 0.5
  5. 9/10 = 0.9

 

Multiplying Two- to Four-digit Decimals

Find the Product.

0.324 x 0.8 =2.592

0.009 x 0.06 =0.054

0.021 x 0.08 =0.168

That’s just some of sum examples for you to get the formula.

 

Understanding Percentage

Percent is a special ratio that compares a certain number to 100%. The symbol for percent is %

Write the missing number for each letter on the blank

  1. 37% = a/100– a = 37
  2. 40/100 = b%= 40%
  3. 30% = c/10– c = 3
  4. 5/10 = d%= 50%
  5. e% = 12/100– e%= 12%
  6. 115/100 = f%=115%
  7. g% = 35/10– g%= 335%
  8. h% = 1/4– h%= 25%
  9. 25/100 = i%= 25%

 

Finding Percentage Rates

Fill in each blank to make a true statement

  1. 5% of 18 is 2
  2. 50% of 48 is 24
  3. 12 is 10% of 120
  4. 20% of 150 is 30
  5. 40% of 125 is 50
  6. 80% of 72 is 54
  7. 40 is 80% of 50
  8. 6 is 20% of 30

 

Understanding Probability

Probability is the likelihood that an event will happen. An event is any happening .

Give the probability of each event

A box contains the number cards given below

10           11         13       10        14           10

  1. Picking a card with number 10.   Equally likely
  2. Picking a card with an odd number.  Unlikely
  3. Picking a card with an even number.  Likely
  4. Picking a card with a number more than 14. Impossible
  5. Picking a card with a number less than 13.  Likely
  6. Picking a card with number more than 10.  Certain

 

 

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Author:

I am a smart, kind and cheerful 10 year old. My hobbies include playing the piano and playing online games.

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